Zoom’s heartbreaking call grandson received from ailing grandmother trapped in Sydney Covid ward


One family is terrified for the life of their beloved grandmother who contracted Covid while in a Sydney hospital, as they recall hearing people screaming in pain during her heartbreaking video chats.

Peggy and Sam Pozoglou are concerned for the physical and mental health of Sam’s grandmother, Christy Katehos, 83, who is trapped in a Covid ward at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney after catching the virus from the Canterbury Hospital.

“I don’t want to remember her as I saw her in the Zoom last night. Confined in this hospital, with no family member, with some patients screaming in pain in the background, ”said grandson Sam.

It comes amid repeated warnings that Sydney hospitals will be overwhelmed with patients when the lockdown ends, with 244 people with Covid currently in intensive care.

Due to hospitals isolating Covid patients in order to prevent the spread of the virus, the family are not allowed to see Ms Katehos and she says basic services such as cleaning and access to a proper shower are impacted.

“Every day that I call my grandmother, her morale and positivity have dropped dramatically. She describes me on the phone: “Sam, the hygiene in this hospital is by far the worst I have ever seen in my life in Australia,” Sam said.

Ms Katehos, who does not speak much English, had fluid drained from her lungs at Canterbury Hospital, where it was discovered that she also had breast cancer, which had spread throughout her body.

Christy Katehos (pictured with her grandson Sam) is trapped in a Covid ward at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney after contracting Covid while being treated for unrelated illnesses at Canterbury Hospital

She then contracted Covid from another patient at the hospital and was transferred to the RPA’s Covid department.

Peggy Pozoglou said the doctor was crying on the phone when she was told about her mother’s condition.

Ms Pozoglou was told that her mother would not receive a ventilator if she needed one because her cancer was so far away that she had no chance of surviving.

“That’s what they told me, then, and now I’m just waiting thinking, will I ever see my mother again, ever,” Ms. Pozoglou said. A topical matter.

Ms Katehos does not speak much English, with family saying basic services such as cleaning are affected due to staff overwork and the isolation process

Ms Katehos does not speak much English, with family saying basic services such as cleaning are affected due to staff overwork and the isolation process

Ms Pozoglou said her mother might not get a ventilator if she needed one because her breast cancer is so far away that she would not survive (pictured, zooming in on her mother in hospital)

Ms Pozoglou said her mother might not get a ventilator if she needed one because her breast cancer is so far away that she would not survive (pictured, zooming in on her mother in hospital)

In New South Wales, there are more than 1,266 people diagnosed with Covid in hospital. 244 people are in intensive care and 118 people need ventilators to breathe.

Ten more deaths were reported on Wednesday.

Healthcare workers are under enormous pressure, with many being pushed to breaking point, as health officials say the worst is yet to come once the state opens up.

Australian Paramedic Association delegate Brett Simpson said many patients often wait 30 to 60 minutes before an ambulance can even answer their call.

There are currently more than 1,266 people with COVID-19 in NSW hospital, 244 people in intensive care and 118 on ventilators (pictured, intensive care staff at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney)

There are currently more than 1,266 people with COVID-19 in NSW hospital, 244 people in intensive care and 118 on ventilators (pictured, intensive care staff at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney)

“The worst case scenario for us is that we are witnessing a worsening of conditions. You know, we are already seeing people literally dying in their living rooms from Covid and other diseases unrelated to Covid because they had to wait so long for treatment, ”he noted.

The latest figures show that 15% of all Covid cases have been hospitalized since the start of the epidemic. This represents at least 4,142 patients.

The union says healthcare workers are overwhelmed with the struggling city’s healthcare system in the three months leading up to the latest wave of Covid.

In those three months, there were 329,709 responses from ambulances for life-threatening jobs in New South Wales alone, the highest since 2010.

The union says healthcare workers are under enormous pressure as the system struggles ahead of the current Covid outbreak (pictured, workers at a vaccination center in Sydney on Tuesday)

The union says healthcare workers are under enormous pressure as the system struggles ahead of the current Covid outbreak (pictured, workers at a vaccination center in Sydney on Tuesday)

Ambulances arrived in less than 15 minutes for less than half of those jobs, the lowest result in a decade.

Mr Simpson says the result is the most unsatisfactory the union has ever had and noted that healthcare workers are worried about when the state will start opening up again as cases are set to rise again in arrow.

“We implore the public not only for their own safety, but for the health of the ambos, the nurses, the doctors who treat them and the system itself. We need people to be vaccinated to try to prevent the tsunami of patients coming our way, ”he said.

Amanda Gulasi knows all too well the state of the healthcare system after contracting the virus a few weeks ago after believing in anti-vaccination conspiracy theories.

Australian Paramedic Association delegate Brett Simpson said patients had to wait 30 to 60 minutes for an ambulance due to the demand they were in (pictured, an ambulance in Redfern)

Australian Paramedic Association delegate Brett Simpson said patients had to wait 30 to 60 minutes for an ambulance due to the demand they were in (pictured, an ambulance in Redfern)

After getting so ill, she called the triple zero but claims that even though a paramedic arrived and helped her out, she had to wait five hours for an ambulance.

She spent three nights in the hospital.

She begged residents to stay home if they can because the system is already very busy and under so much pressure.

Julie Trimarchi also told the program that her Covid-positive neighbor called the triple zero four times in a week to be taken to hospital, to be brought home a few hours later.

She warned others to only use the system if they really need it while others need urgent care.

A spokesperson for the Sydney Local Health District released a statement regarding Ms Katehos’ situation, saying NSW Health is continuously monitoring the capacity of hospitals and ensuring that strategies are in place to return intensive care capacity available during this period.

“All COVID-19 patients who need help with showering are offered bed baths, as the water pressure and heat from a shower can cause virus-laden droplets to aerosolize,” endangering other patients and staff. Sheets are always changed regularly for all patients, ”the statement said.

Residents have warned others to only use ambulances and health services if they really need them, as the system is already so stretched (pictured, a paramedic in Sydney)

Residents have warned others to only use ambulances and health services if they really need them, as the system is already so stretched (pictured, a paramedic in Sydney)


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